The Most Generous Book in the World

The TL/DR Synopsis Synopsis: Illustration and reviews for The Who, the What, and the When: 65 Artists Illustrate the Secret Sidekicks of History, which includes my text on Alan Turing and Christopher Morcom.
Links to: The book, the illustrator’s site, reviews and mentions.

The novel, the album, and the videos.  One bundle, free forever

The novel, the album, and the videos. One bundle, free forever


I was recently invited to write a short piece on Alan Turing and his childhood friend and secret crush, Christopher Morcom, for a book called The Who, the What, and the When: 65 Artists Illustrate the Secret Sidekicks of History, about the relatively unknown people who fostered, supported, loved, and nurtured historical figures (see my post “Alan Turing Hits the Red Carpet, Chris Morcom Hits the Books“).

I’ve finally had a chance to see the art that accompanies my text (or perhaps I should say “the art to which my text is an accompaniment,” since the title of the book stresses the artists rather than the writers).  It’s a beautiful image by award-winning illustrator Keith Negley.  You can find a nice piece on Negley in my favorite art rag, Juxtapoz, right here.

Alan Turing and Christopher Morcom, by Keith Negley.

Alan Turing and Christopher Morcom, by Keith Negley.

The book has also had some reviews and mentions, including an extensive one (from which I stole the title for this post) at Brain Pickings, a site I check religiously and recommend highly.

I think it’s fair to say that their review is glowing, and there’s even a brief, complimentary mention of my section:

Writer Nas Hedron tells the story of a British boy named Christopher Morcom — Turing’s teenage crush — who pulled young Alan out of his notoriously awkward shell… When Morcom died of bovine tuberculosis, his death devastated Turing beyond measure… As he struggled to understand how a mind as brilliant as Chris’s could just cease to exist with the death of the brain, he inevitably began probing the relationship between the two and the foundation of consciousness. Hedron elegantly captures the lifelong impact of the tragedy:

“This line of thinking, about intangible thoughts housed in tangible brains, would run through each of Turing’s accomplishments.”

The Brain Pickings review

The Brain Pickings review

The book has also been received well in The Guardian and on Design Milk.

And finally, the team that assembled the book has also put together a great animated video trailer, embedded below.

Pick up your copy today!

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